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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Following 2 bolts to my turbo deciding they wanted to remain where they were I've had the joyous task of removing one which snapped and another that mangled its threads.

Top tip here- always double check the bolts you're supplied have enough thread!

So, one was a simple case of re-tapping, the other however.....
It had sheared flush with the flange and being a high tensile bolt which had become tempered with heat cycles wasn't going to fall out.
The most common methods for removal are:
Drilling with a cobalt drill bit set (slow, lots of pressure and cutting fluid).
Welding a nut onto the remaining stud.
Drilling out and then an easy-out.

Having tried and failed to weld to a stud in another car way back, this wasn't on my list of things to do. I managed to drill though and killed a couple of drill bits but it was off centre so I couldn't continue chain drilling.

All was not lost, I used a dremel grinding attachement in a battery drill which ate it for breakfast, relatively speaking.

Does anyone else have any tips or handy tricks- short of spark erosion- for future reference?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
i ended up getting another housing, i wasin the same boat, but beforei did so i did just cut the side and turned it into a slot just to get me buy until i got a housing and just used a long smaller bolt and nut to clamp it up
Good idea on the slot if all other options are exhausted. I was starting to think about a nut and bolt, but it became a matter of principle! I'm still amazed at the Dremel grinding bit working so well.

Centre punch and high quality drills bits, deal with snap bolts on a near daily basis. Does me in!
Copper grease every bolt I put on now.
I think the issue was that the bolts' shank was too long and it deformed the top threads, one of those things and goes to show double check parts you're supplied. I hindsight I should have made a better centre mark, or ground the remaining bolt flat or into a slight dish.
 

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Sometimes a centre punch doesn't mark high tensile it just jumps, so I use a small ball tip sort of dremel attachment and mark up with that (not sure what the actual attachment is called)
 

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Any dodgy looking bolts should always get a swift smack or 2 of a hammer before removal. Works 9 times out of 10. :)
 
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