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Go into the menu system of the router, via it's IP address and set up a WEP or WPA key.

Reading the router manual will tell you how to do this. You're best off setting up the wireless network security with the router wired to your laptop. It just makes it easier.

Paul
 

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Don't bother with MAC address filtering, it takes seconds to break.

WPA2-AES is extremely secure. You MUST use as long and as complicated key as you can muster. uppercase, lowercase, numbers & special characters... Up to 64 ASCII characters long. You should also change the key at regular intervals.

My Job Title = Senior Wireless Consultant :D
 

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Don't bother with MAC address filtering, it takes seconds to break.

WPA2-AES is extremely secure. You MUST use as long and as complicated key as you can muster. uppercase, lowercase, numbers & special characters... Up to 64 ASCII characters long. You should also change the key at regular intervals.

My Job Title = Senior Wireless Consultant :D
It has already been cracked. 60 seconds according to this.

http://www.shawnhogan.com/2006/08/how-to-crack-128-bit-wireless-networks.html
 

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Do you really think anyone with the knowledge to do so would bother to hack an individuals wireless home network?

If an individual was that way inclined, they'd go and sit outside Starbucks and sniff all the packets flying around there from the business users happily using their wireless network.

Paul
Do not enable the wireless.

Use a copper cable rather than the wireless you will be more secure.

Most of the encryption can be cracked anyways, even those using mac address filtering if someone was so inclined to do so.

http://www.aircrack-ng.org/doku.php
 

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Do you really think anyone with the knowledge to do so would bother to hack an individuals wireless home network?

If an individual was that way inclined, they'd go and sit outside Starbucks and sniff all the packets flying around there from the business users happily using their wireless network.

Paul
Thought wifi was free @ starbucks. So no need.
 

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If you read it, it's just a brute force attack, hence me saying to use random letters, numbers, etc... This isn't a vulnerability in the technology, it's a problem with the squidgy bit that makes it work!

If you know what you're doing you never need to pay for public wireless, just wait for somebody else to pay and then spoof their connection ;) But that's completely illegal and shouldn't be done.

Business users really should be using VPN, and anybody using public wifi should be using HTTPS. ie, for hotmail, hit the "sign in using enhanced security" button! :smthumbup
 

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If you read it, it's just a brute force attack, hence me saying to use random letters, numbers, etc... This isn't a vulnerability in the technology, it's a problem with the squidgy bit that makes it work!

If you know what you're doing you never need to pay for public wireless, just wait for somebody else to pay and then spoof their connection ;) But that's completely illegal and shouldn't be done.

Business users really should be using VPN, and anybody using public wifi should be using HTTPS. ie, for hotmail, hit the "sign in using enhanced security" button! :smthumbup
I agree, just pointing out it can be done. How many home users will use a complex key.

worth a look

http://www.irongeek.com/i.php?page=videos/airpcap-cain-wpa-cracking
 

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I agree, just pointing out it can be done. How many home users will use a complex key.

worth a look

http://www.irongeek.com/i.php?page=videos/airpcap-cain-wpa-cracking
Doesn't matter how many tools you send me links to, they all basically exploit weak keys. Pick a weak key and you deserve to get hacked, simple. Pick a strong key and you're as secure as anything :smthumbup

It's worth pointing out that with WPA/WPA2, if they crack the key, they only get network access, they can't decrypt any traffic they sniff. If you're using WEP and somebody gets the key, they get network access AND they can decrypt any traffic they sniff.
 

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Omg, have I wandered onto a CIA forum lol, i doubt many people would want to hack into an average home network. Standard network security and maybe mac filtering should be sufficient.

WPA's pretty good and accompanied by mac filtering if the router supports it:smthumbup
 

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It's MI6 actually, none of that yanky rhubarb...

Now keep it quiet! :D

Paul
Omg, have I wandered onto a CIA forum lol, i doubt many people would want to hack into an average home network. Standard network security and maybe mac filtering should be sufficient.

WPA's pretty good and accompanied by mac filtering if the router supports it:smthumbup
 

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Most wireless connections "out of the box" have security. We use sky and i can remember our box being shipped with WPA pre-configured.

I dont find many connections these days that dont, though i'm sure if they really want to get into your network "home network" then they probably will.
 

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Most wireless connections "out of the box" have security. We use sky and i can remember our box being shipped with WPA pre-configured.

I dont find many connections these days that dont, though i'm sure if they really want to get into your network "home network" then they probably will.
Again, that's really quite wrong. Maybe a box coming directly from (and preconfigured by) your ISP is, but if you buy a router off the shelf in Maplin or whatever, they're not secure by default.

Plus, WPA is so easily cracked these days also. I attended a "hacking prevention course", hosted by a Finnish white-hat hacker a year or so back... Some of the things he showed us were astounding, to say the least.
 

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Back to topic, use WPA2 if you can as non compliant devices will fall to WPA Level 1 due to the schema of WPA2 being simply an extension of WPA.

WEP, do not use as there are compatibility problems with certain manufacturer brands and it is not as secure as WPA/WPA2.

It is unlikely anyone is going to commit the resources to perform a pen test on a consumer wireless end point that is protected via wep, wpa or wpa2.
 
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