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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just had my car serviced on Thursday with all the usual done including some HKS Iridium plugs.

I have just noticed on the sales invoice that they changed the oil using Semi-Synthetic rather than fully Synthetic.

I have spoken to them and they have stated that Semi-Synthetic is O.K.

What do you Guys and amp; Girls Think.

Should I go back and get the oil changed again to Fully Synthetic.

Skeletor
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Depends on the mileage , if it was yr first oilchange service at 1200 miles then it is accepted practice 2 use semi-synth up2 the next , 4500 mile , service , then go 2 fully synth.
If yr beyond the above , then abso-bloody-lutely take it back and have it changed 2 fully synth...................I dunno , some garages eh !
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have a friend who blew his 4G63 in his STANDARD E6RS2 after 7.000 miles using semi syunthetic oil. His garage said it is better for the running in, will allow for more friction. A little to much friction it seems... :(

This is VERY serious, no bullshit. Of course I dont know if it is due to the oil, but it happened just like I said.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I believe that the semi or fully synth is deemed the correct oil to use by Mitsubishi however I concur with what Evoboy said.

Can I make a suggestion to anyone who gets their car serviced at a main dealer?
Go and buy your own oil and get the garage to use it (thats what I now do) as it has 3 advantages:
1) You get to choose what oil you want and as long as it is to the manufacturers recommended specifications then the warranty will not be affected.
2) The same brand and grade of oil can be used throughout the ownership of the car rather than perhaps chopping and changing if say a garage decides to change their supplier or their supplier changes what oil they provide. Chopping and changing oils is not an ideal situation, pick a brand and stick with it.
3) You can get the oil a lot cheaper than what garages charge you for (I reckon I saved at least £20 last service by providing my own oil).

If you don't want to do this then just make sure that you specify that you want fully synthetic oil used before you take it in.

Claudius,
I would find it extremely hard to believe that an engine would blow just because semi synth oil was used, especially after just 7000 miles. There must have been another reason behind it however you are right about the reasons for using semi synth when running an engine in.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well I find it hard to believe too, but Jean-Paul definitely believed it telling from his face! :( He is a very experienced 40 year old amateur rallye driver who takes care about his cars, check all fluid levels and various things regularly and gets his car serviced by a guy whe's been knowing for 25 years and who's always done all his cars. There was nothing wrong with the way he treated the car, always let it heat up and cool down, more than most people would. He's a genuine enthusiast who would never take chances with a car and has done nothing wrong except using semi-synthetic oil. Although I do not believe this is the main reason for the engine failure (rods through the bloc), what could it be given his car was bog standard running 0.8 bars etc etc?
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I am no expert but it would probably be down to bad factory workmanship (aledgely) or possible poor quality/faulty components. By the way I bet his face looked like mine at 13,500 miles, I know the feeling
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Cheers for the information guys.

I will be going back to the garage who did the service.

I will take Heave Ho Six's advice and take my own oil.

Can anyone suggest a good oil to purchase.

Cheers

Skeletor
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Here I go again , Redline or Amsoil 10w30 . I use the Redline. Buy from Delta Oil (Redline) or Demontweeks (both)
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Evoboy,
Don't worry Evoboy it is in the FAQ's so hopefully that is that last time you will have to answer that one ;)
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Evo boy/ HH6 just to draw the thread out a bit longer, any sense in using different oils to suit different uses, Ie: winter / short commuting, could benefit from different grades to summer flat out trackdays. whats the expert verdict?
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
No , the 10w30 Redline or Amsoil will easily cope with the situations u describe. Proviso's wud b , if the car does a large proportion of it's mileage as short journies ie , more than 50% , change the oil more often. If the engine is producing signifincantly more power than standard , say in excess of 385 bhp and is used on lot's of trackdays , install a larger oil cooler 2 maintain reasonable oil temp.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Evoboy, why not use oil that is thicker at higher temps? Even NA cars use 0W40. I dont get it, can u explain the logic behind it, please? :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The oil pump , bearing clearances , oil circuit flow , oil flow thru bearings etc etc r all factors that determine the viscosity required.
Shud an oil with 2 high a viscosity b used then the oil pump will heat up the oil due 2 higher resistance and this will reduce flow , there will b less flow thru the bearings and oil circuit which will cause the oil temp 2 increase and the reduced flow will cause temp rise in pistons and turbo bearings etc.
This is only a summary but u can c that the most important aspect of lubrication is flow rate , it is the volume of oil flowing that determines the cooling ability of the oil system , and the viscosity is selected 2 ensure adequate flow.
Other factors r oil drag which causes power loss , the speed at which oil flows from a cold start and operation of hydraulic valve lifters.
 
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