Lancer Register Forum banner
1 - 20 of 59 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,966 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Search terms: how to, howto, how-to, guide, faq, restore, re-lacquer, re lacquer, re lacquer, carbon fibre fiber, carbonfibre, carbonfiber, clean, repair, fix, renew, redo.

Background
I recently picked up a 'good value' carbon fibre spark plug cover. It was really cheap because it had some defects, namely a big crack and also some more minor scratches and scuffs in the lacquer. It needed a refurb!

So I had a bash and I think it turned out all right. So this isn't neccessarily a definitive technique, but it worked for me so I figured I'd share it.

Parts required:
- Sanding block
- 800 to 2000 grade wet and dry paper
- Rubbing compound
- Scratch X
- Rattle can of clear lacquer
- Polish
- Wax
- Couple of cloths
- Water supply

Step 1 - Sanding back
First step is pretty straight forward, just wrap the wet and dry around the sanding block and get to work. Be careful not to apply too much pressure, and don't go too far else you'll damage the weave. You want to use the finest grade you can get away with and remove the minimum of lacquer. Make sure you keep the whole thing lubricated. You'll be able to do most things with the block, but you will also probably need to cut the sheet of paper up and do some by hand, as you can more easily manipulate the paper into the right profile with your fingertips.

Because the piece will be wet it will always look glossy. You'll need to dry periodically in order to see what's been done and what hasn't. If you start with a grit number lower than 1200 or 2000 you should work up to these and use them for a final pass.

When you're done, give it a proper rinse and dry thoroughly before lacquering. (I think I even washed it with soap and then rinsed and dried!)

Step 2 - Lacquer
Check the instructions on the can, but basically it's obvious stuff like keep the can at room temperature and spray somewhere windless and dustless if you can.

I've struggled in the past with application of the lacquer, but basically, you need to try to put each coat on in one fluid motion, rather than spraying from a great height and doing several passes.

I had always thought that spraying from 'on high' with super light coats was going to work, but it doesn't. What happens is the droplets dry out on their way to the surface, so you get an 'orange peel' finish. So instead move the can closer and move sideways SLOWER. However, the massive caveat on this is to not go so slow you get a run! It's definitely a balancing act in being slow enough to allow the lacquer to 'flow' on the surface but not so slow it builds up and runs. (PS - don't try to 'blow away' runs using the gas from the can as this will add more lacquer and make it worse, not better!)

Allow about 10-15min between coats and put on about 3.

After the final coat let it dry for 24h before inspecting. If you're good, then you're done. If you're like me then you'll need to do some more finishing!

Step 3 - Finishing
If you get some orange peel (like I did - still learning) then you can flatten this out using the rubbing compound or 2000 grit. Rubbing compound goes on with a wet cloth and work it over the piece. Keep it wet, then wash and dry off with a clean cloth. Using the paper is more aggressive, but may be required depending on how much work is needed. You definitely need to go gently!

This process may dull the surface, but follow this up with the scratch X and it will become shiny again.

Step 4 - Waxing and Polishing
Making sure the piece is clean and dry from the last step you can apply your favourite polish, followed by a couple of coats of your favourite wax.

Job done!
Ask always, questions/comments/improvements welcome.

Photos now added, continues after 3 posts.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,966 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Reserved for photos 2.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,966 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I took more photos than I expected. Here's some more.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,966 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Cheers.

Yeah, I guess it would depend on the nature of the damage, but I don't see any reason why not. The main thing is not to ruin the weave by sanding too much. All the other steps can be reversed by sanding the lacquer back and starting again.

I know that I wouldn't have any hesitation about trying to refurb any of the other carbon fiber parts on my car now, as the result I achieved on this piece was so much better than I expected.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
Good job, Nice write up & pics.

I'll have a go at this when i get a chance, got a carbon slam panel that was scuffed during transit so this guide will be very helpful cheers :smthumbup
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,048 Posts
Nice work bud, my spark plug cover is looking a bit dull/faded, hopefully wont need a re-lacquer but will get some of the rubbing compound and polishing stuff you mention and give that and some other bits a go :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,906 Posts
I'm considering having a bash at my spoiler in the next few days. (planning a hangover tomorrow and maybe sunday, so possibly monday) But yeah, my spoiler is the worst i've ever seen. It's shocking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,906 Posts
Must send a link to this thread to my Bodyshop as they have misgivings about re-laquering our spoiler blade. Thanks Ben :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,906 Posts
I'm currently attacking my spoiler with wet and dry, nothing to lose i reckon as it was that bad i was going to replace it anyway.

So yeah, i'm not sure how it's going really. Sometimes i pour water on and it looks fantastic. But then it dries out and looks awful.

The trouble is i can't figure out where i'm at. I'm using Yattys guide:
http://www.lancerregister.com/showthread.php?t=213545&highlight=spoiler

But for a novice it's difficult to know which layer you're currently at and i'm afraid of going too far.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 
1 - 20 of 59 Posts
Top