Lancer Register Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone got them? What are they like, compared to other mainstream replacements?
I haven't noticed anyone say they have them, is this a bad thing?
I had the impression they were Nova and Max Power upgrades!
Any comments

P
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Hi I got them fitted to my Evo 6. It makes the car look alot meaner with them being lower thwn the standard springs. The next week I went around Donnington with SIDC and the car handled well. Maybe just because I was now lower to the ground. Car very stiff. Even more so now on the roads.

Have had no probs though
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I had them, and they make very little difference. They are shorter, and progressive, but rated the same as the standard EVO springs. Massive improvement in looks, and a bit better handling (mostly due to the lower centre of gravity).

Not really good enough for track work - too much roll, eats the outside edges of the passenger side tyre!

I would be tempted to go for linear springs, but the problem is that the dampers just don't control the car properly, and the EVO has to rely on progressive springs to stop it bouncing off the road. A proper damper is required.

Obviously even the cheapest Proflex or Drummond kit is £1500, but well worth it. People seem to speak well of the Leda stuff, and that is about £800 I think - so may be worth looking at - especially if you intend doing trackdays. They will pay for themselves in the money you save on tyres!
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Leda stuff has a good reputation on other motors. I phoned them up for prices etc and they quoted £826|PLS|VAT. This gives a dual tube adjustable shock complete with springs and all mounting bits with an adjustable ride height. They are rebuildable at a much reduced cost.

I would be interested to hear whether anyone has tried them coz' they are cheaper than the alternatives and have a good reputation.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I am running LEDA adjustable suspension on my E6, the initial setup of damper valving and spring rates (350lbs fr, 225lbs rr) was a compromise for use mainly on road, body control was much improved and because of 24 position damping adjustment ride could be made to be much better than the standard setup. Adjustability in damping, ride height, and camber is very good.

But for my driving style and frequent track day usage meant this original setup was far too soft for me. Not a problem, I took the shocks back to LEDA and they revalved them to my specs with new seals etc, while I waited, and I purchased some new springs 450lbs fr, 400lbs rr (£20 ea). Excellent service!

I fitted the suspension back on the car, changing to GrN bushes where needed and set the geometry to a more radical spec. It feels superb now, grip and feedback are astonishing and because there is such a large adjustment in damping rates available I can have it very hard on the track, but also still comfortable on the road.

It took a while to work out the damping and spring rates that suited me, but now I have got there I am very pleased indeed.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've just had a set of Eibachs springs fitted that I was told may help improve the handling. (My car is a standard 6). I took the car to a track day at Bentwaters in Suffolk and the improvement is impressive ! especially on tighter corners - I have no idea what sort of time a standard Evo 6 can ultimately do at this track on normal road tyres but the best I got was 1m 14.7 seconds mostly were 1m 15 - 16secs (they had a long coned chicane at the end of the straight). I was on a new set of Bridgestone Polenza 03's (which I can't believe are very good for dry track days).

The springs make the car less nervous especially under braking and you can feel that there is knowwhere
near as much lean as the standard springs. On tight corners the car can be pushed through much harder
and on the fast turns (70mph|PLS|) the car still understeers but the whole situation is far more controllable than before.

The ride itself for road use is unchanged - except the car just better if you are pushing it.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jim Rainbird
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
ExKarter,

How did the SO3s stand up to the trackday. I have Eibach springs and SO2s and the outer edge of the nearside tyres (especially front nearside) wear very rapidly - as Blade described. Are you getting a similar wear pattern?

Darryl.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
dlgis - Get your front camber adjusted to 2 degrees negative, and check your pressures on the track! Should keep them to 30psi, or the edges will overheat and wear.

If you have done all of that, then it is the roll I am afraid :(
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Blade,

Thanks for the advice. I will check to see whether the strut bolt with arrow is set to -1 or -2deg camber. What do you recommend for the rear ? -1.5deg? Is there a similar bolt adjustment?
There seems to be a variety of opinions on whether to inflate or deflate the tyres slightly for track use. So far I have gone for increasing them so maybe thats not helping :(
Also I have not been adjusting the tyre pressures as they heat up - so I'll try keeping them at 30psi next time out. As you will have realised I'm a bit new to this game!

Darryl
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
i rate eibachs too
when changing from so1,s to so2,s i run 34psi front to get the same turn in feel as the so1,s,anyone else noticed this ?
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Blade, you say to run 30psi, are you talking about on track? I normally run somewhere between 35-40psi on the front and still end up scrubbing the outer edge of the nearside front. Standard springs mind! When I've run lower pressures, it eats the tyres even worse!
Steve
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Blade, you say to run 30psi, are you talking about on track? I normally run somewhere between 35-40psi on the front and still end up scrubbing the outer edge of the nearside front. Standard springs mind! When I've run lower pressures, it eats the tyres even worse!
Steve

You have to keep checking the pressures after several laps! Start at 30psi - after 5 laps, they may be 40!!. Keep dropping them to stay at 30psi hot.

Try setting your front camber to 2 degrees by adjusting the eccentric camber bolt. A front strut brace will also help.

Try being less aggressive - minimise body roll by keeping the car balanced, and don't have too much lock when turning in - smoothness means long tyre life!
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Blade
I don't disagree with what you are saying but after asking talking to several people at Scooby track days and even Mike Wood at Prodrive, they've always said to put them at 35-40psi cold to stop scrubbing edges!
When I first started doing track days and didn't increase pressure, I scrubbed the edges even worse. As for smoothness, it's something I always try to practise. I used to get frustrated with the scoob as you had to be aggressive with it to go fast otherwise it wouldn't oversteer. Twice when I was a bit quick turning in, the back end came right round too fast!
I agree about the camber and I'll get that sorted once I get some springs and strut brace.

Does anyone else do the same with their tyres on track?

Cheers
Steve
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Rosco, it ain't a scoob, and I can only tell you what I know - I only use the EVO for track days (12 in 12 months).
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hi Rossco

I not a expert but like blade do a lot of track days I think I have done a dozen or so this year, Lets say 13(I have to beat Blade at something :)) With road tyres I would pump them up, may be not as high as 40psi but at least 5 psi higher than you run on the road. You may find at if you over inflate the steering becomes very spongy and ture in is not so sharp if so the the tyres have over heated and expanded ie. least surface area in contact. Helps tyre wear but ultimately not good for the track.

I run slicks on track days and I only inflate these to 30 psi as they heat up so quickly, after a session they are over 40 psi and more. So basically try it out if you stick to normal road pressures you will roll the edges more.

Blade also runs super stick road tyres so his method is good for him.

Just my tupence worth.

Thorak

Ps. If you want more oversteer without messing about with the camber settings just pump up the rear by a extra few psi.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Blade - I know it's not a scoob, that's why I've got a smile on my face!!! I'm not saying you're wrong, but it goes against what everyone else has told me about road tyres. I was always told that the side walls are too soft to cope with the extra forces from track use. Thoraks comments have just helped explain a little more to say that you don't use road tyres.
I'm grateful for these comments as I've just bought a set of slicks for my next track day and without knowing any better I'd probably have pumped them up too high. Blade, you ought to know after all, it sounds like you devote your life to track use and I'm sure tyres is one thing you haven't skimped on!
No offence intended but like I said, it went against what everyone else had told me, refering to road tyres.
Cheers
Steve
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
1 you cannot check tyre pressures hot as you will get a false reading,this is why f1 cars use nitrogen not normal air
2 The last time i used slicks,you had to use racing tubes (pure rubber) as the tyrewalls were porous,
is this still the case or have they improved ?
this was cut slicks i might add
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
You must check them hot! As well as pressures, you test temperatures too with a Pyrometer. Don't compare with formula 1, that is totally different technology.

Technology has moved on alot - no racing tubes. Just like ordinary tyres, but stiffer and stickier.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top