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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Removing my calipers for a full rebuild next weekend, any advice prior to me starting the job, which corner to start first or recommend space per side for working in, useful tips etc!?
 

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Only that you should fit new copper washers to the brake lines. If replacing the flexible brake lines for new ones, invest in a proper brake pipe spanner and some plusgas.
Could be an idea to crack all of the nipples while the calipers are still in place, it may also be a plan to pump the brake fluid out of the system via one of the nipples.
Hope that helps :)
 

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Ive just finished mine, i firstly jammed the brake pedal to the floor and wedged it with a length of wood ( this will stop any fluid coming out your brake lines!!!)

I then removed each calliper, you will get a small amount of fluid (that you can mop up with a cloth) come out.

Keep all your nuts / bolts / washers safe and keep each corner separate! I put a big tray in the boot and put all the components from each corner in a separate pile in each corner of the tray.

When you re fit, simply reverse the order, bleed your brakes ( i opted to change the fluid while did this) then check for leaks under pressure.

Simples:smthumbup
 

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Phil
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Removing my calipers for a full rebuild next weekend, any advice prior to me starting the job, which corner to start first or recommend space per side for working in, useful tips etc!?
So these are OE Brembo calipers on a VI? And you want to remove them from the car to clean on the bench? Do you have OE rubber brake lines?

If the answer to all of the above is "yes", then the order of proceeding is broadly as follows:-

1. There's no need to remove the calipers in any particular order.

2. For each corner it's the same procedure.

3. Once safely off the ground and with a wheel removed, the first thing I'd do is remove the pad retaining pins by punching them out. You can do this on the bench, but if they prove at all seized in you will get better purchase doing it while the calipers are still on the car.

4. Remove pads (if step 3 has been followed)

5. Remove the two large bolts that secure the caliper to the hub - 17mm or 19mm, I can't remember which! These can be pretty tight so a good quality socket and decent length bar is likely to be needed.

6. Carefully pull the caliper away from the disc and temporarily support on a box or blocks, but don't allow it to dangle from the brake hoses.

7. Now place a clamp of the brake hose. If you don't have any, then buy some, these are inexpensive.

8. Using a 14mm (I think) socket, carefully undo the banjo bolt on the back of the caliper. A small amount of brake fluid is bound to come out. Alternatively you could do 6. and 7. before doing 5 - makes no real difference.

And that about it.

If you like the wheels can go back on and the car can be moved, but the only braking you'll have available is the handbrake.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Cheers for all the advice, some of that is great detail and should hopefully ensure I don't make any mistakes :) - last time I changed my passat I couldn't have give a damm smashing around with hammer and spanner, but need to be a little more careful this time!!

Where can I buy the clamps, halfords? I am taking the brakes and sending them for refurbishment, I don't have the facility to powder coat them at home....
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Cheers buddy, all calipers off and ready for powder coating now :)... Surprised I found some original brembo disc's - not sure on pads, those are getting thrown away, or someone can have for cheap, they have 6mm left on....

The discs may also be of use to someone - plently of "meat" left on them.

What adivce would you give to painting the disc with a silver on the none contact faces???

So these are OE Brembo calipers on a VI? And you want to remove them from the car to clean on the bench? Do you have OE rubber brake lines?

If the answer to all of the above is "yes", then the order of proceeding is broadly as follows:-

1. There's no need to remove the calipers in any particular order.

2. For each corner it's the same procedure.

3. Once safely off the ground and with a wheel removed, the first thing I'd do is remove the pad retaining pins by punching them out. You can do this on the bench, but if they prove at all seized in you will get better purchase doing it while the calipers are still on the car.

4. Remove pads (if step 3 has been followed)

5. Remove the two large bolts that secure the caliper to the hub - 17mm or 19mm, I can't remember which! These can be pretty tight so a good quality socket and decent length bar is likely to be needed.

6. Carefully pull the caliper away from the disc and temporarily support on a box or blocks, but don't allow it to dangle from the brake hoses.

7. Now place a clamp of the brake hose. If you don't have any, then buy some, these are inexpensive.

8. Using a 14mm (I think) socket, carefully undo the banjo bolt on the back of the caliper. A small amount of brake fluid is bound to come out. Alternatively you could do 6. and 7. before doing 5 - makes no real difference.

And that about it.

If you like the wheels can go back on and the car can be moved, but the only braking you'll have available is the handbrake.
 

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Cheers buddy, all calipers off and ready for powder coating now :)... Surprised I found some original brembo disc's - not sure on pads, those are getting thrown away, or someone can have for cheap, they have 6mm left on....

The discs may also be of use to someone - plently of "meat" left on them.

What adivce would you give to painting the disc with a silver on the none contact faces???
Hi keiron, would you tell me who are refurbishing them, are they rebuilding them,
As I need mine doing as slider plates need doing.
Cheers
Justin:smthumbup
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Got Godspeed to rebuild them, only gone and scratched one too when trying to bleed brakes :( one of the nipples was a little loose :( always the bloody same the damm things...

They do look nice though!!
 

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Nice that keiron:smthumbup
What was involved , did they rebuild them ect , if you don't mind me asking how much did it cost?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Has anyone had any issues with newly refurbed calipers? I am sure all the nipples are leaking, originally thought it was one, but after a couple of drives it appears all are leaking - it has removed the newly painted surface where the rubbers sit...

I am afraid if I tighten any more than the hand spanner I have used already I am going to snap them in there... what problem would I have if they did snap and to be safe does anyone know the correct torque setting for them?
 

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Hi
If the bleed nipples are seeping you havent tightened them up enough , they can go quite tight before you have issues , 35-40 lb ft , tighten them up before you damage the powder coating
Cheers Ian
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi
If the bleed nipples are seeping you havent tightened them up enough , they can go quite tight before you have issues , 35-40 lb ft , tighten them up before you damage the powder coating
Cheers Ian
14N/M on the manual, not sure what that is in lb/ft - I will buy torque wrench tomorrow... as for the paint - that is already damaged - only covered by the rubber seals!!
 

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If the bleed nipples are opened a bit too much while bleeding you will get fluid passing the threads. When bleeding is finished you might have a slight amount of fluid in the nipple which will come out after a drive/when warm.

After installing a new bleed nipple we always take them back out and check the seat and bottom of the bleed nipple. You can see a perfect ring on the bleed nipple where its making contact on the seat.

Easiest way to tell if its weeping would be to get someone in the car pressing the brake pedal hard, If there is an issue it will leak straight away/pedal travel towards the floor. IIRC your calipers needed no extra thread work, If a bleed nipple thread or mounting bolt thread is knackered we would heli-coil them first as last.
 

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Phil
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Hi
If the bleed nipples are seeping you havent tightened them up enough , they can go quite tight before you have issues , 35-40 lb ft , tighten them up before you damage the powder coating
Cheers Ian
14N/M on the manual, not sure what that is in lb/ft - I will buy torque wrench tomorrow... as for the paint - that is already damaged - only covered by the rubber seals!!
14N/M or 10 lb/ft is recommended for a reason! Even in my limited experience of such things. far too frequently have I come across seized nipples due almost certainly to previo8s over-tightening.

The post bleed session stamp on the brake pedal (literally as hard as you can) for a quite lengthy period - long enough for someone outside the car to go round each caliper checking for any leakage - is thoroughly recommended. And, of course, the brake pedal should be resist the pressure and not move throughout this process.
 

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14N/M or 10 lb/ft is recommended for a reason! Even in my limited experience of such things. far too frequently have I come across seized nipples due almost certainly to previo8s over-tightening.
The bleed nipples seize due to corrosion not over tightening. We recently saw a set of calipers from a sub 30K Evo 6 that were last bled new. Pretty much pulled every thread on the way out. People overlook bleeding brakes as part of a routine service.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
14N/M or 10 lb/ft is recommended for a reason! Even in my limited experience of such things. far too frequently have I come across seized nipples due almost certainly to previo8s over-tightening.

The post bleed session stamp on the brake pedal (literally as hard as you can) for a quite lengthy period - long enough for someone outside the car to go round each caliper checking for any leakage - is thoroughly recommended. And, of course, the brake pedal should be resist the pressure and not move throughout this process.
Holding the brake pedal down was completed as descirbed - the leakage that was found originally was "stopped" I suspect it was "opened" when the brakes got warm, we have the same issue on jet engines and components that expand at different rates. :shake:
 

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Phil
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The bleed nipples seize due to corrosion not over tightening. We recently saw a set of calipers from a sub 30K Evo 6 that were last bled new. Pretty much pulled every thread on the way out. People overlook bleeding brakes as part of a routine service.
Yes, both can give rise to issues, but in the particular context of his thread I wanted to emphasise that extra nipple tightening to deal with fluid loss is rarely the right solution.
 
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