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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
i have tera down the engine and it had lick bearing and crank,so i will ofto buy a normal engine to get the crank to replace mine is it wise to remove the balance shaft or what ? its driving me nuts .
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
yes Wreck thats what exactly i'm doing i suppose to get the engine tomorrow so i will exclude the balance shaft i was told that i will have a little vibration that i can live with. Is yours out?
 

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The engine I rebuilt had no balance shafts, but it crankwalked so I am currently running a totally stock n/a engine out of an RVR that has them in. The additional vibration is noticeable but it is not nearly as bad as an engine with the shafts out of time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
hey wreck so what causes the crank to walk? is it because no balance shaft? if there is no balance shaft present ,is it possible to cause crank failure let me know the disadvantage and the advantages of the balance shaft.

Rohan.
 

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Hi Guys, regarding balance shaft removal...

There are several ways of going about it but both front and rear shafts must be removed. The effects will only be evident at about 3-4K rpm when the harmonics were previously cancelled by the shafts.

The rear shaft runs off the oil pump gear which also runs off the timing belt. In my experience it's usually the front shaft to go which results in the balance belt becoming broken and looping around the timing belt, causing it to skip.

Sometimes the balance belt brakes and doesn't take out the timing belt but in those cases the spun bearing which caused the b-shaft failure has thrown metal bits into the engine causing damage anyway.

When removing the shafts one can drop the engine off the mount on the timing belt side while supporting it with a jack. This will allow the shafts to come out while the engine is still in the car.

One would have to remove the timing belt, main face plate behind the belt, oil pan, (transfer case and exhaust) , and splash guards to even begin the job.

After the belts are out and the pan etc are off the shafts can be slid out or hammered if they were damaged. The bearings which have housed the shafts must be spun so the oil ports do not line up with the supply ports on the block. (if the shaft is gone the oil will squirt into space and YOU WILL HAVE LOW OIL PRESSURE!

so be sure to rotate the old bearings to misalign the oil supply ports.

This is a big dirty job. I hope that helps. Some dealerships in the US sell a kit to eliminate the shafts which includes a snub shaft in lieu of the lower B shaft (so you can keep the oil pump sprocket) and a freeze plug for the face plate of the engine where the upper balance shaft protruded through previously.

Alex Grabau

www.dentsport.com
 

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agrabau said:
Hi Guys, regarding balance shaft removal...

There are several ways of going about it but both front and rear shafts must be removed. The effects will only be evident at about 3-4K rpm when the harmonics were previously cancelled by the shafts.

The rear shaft runs off the oil pump gear which also runs off the timing belt. In my experience it's usually the front shaft to go which results in the balance belt becoming broken and looping around the timing belt, causing it to skip.

Sometimes the balance belt brakes and doesn't take out the timing belt but in those cases the spun bearing which caused the b-shaft failure has thrown metal bits into the engine causing damage anyway.

When removing the shafts one can drop the engine off the mount on the timing belt side while supporting it with a jack. This will allow the shafts to come out while the engine is still in the car.

One would have to remove the timing belt, main face plate behind the belt, oil pan, (transfer case and exhaust) , and splash guards to even begin the job.

After the belts are out and the pan etc are off the shafts can be slid out or hammered if they were damaged. The bearings which have housed the shafts must be spun so the oil ports do not line up with the supply ports on the block. (if the shaft is gone the oil will squirt into space and YOU WILL HAVE LOW OIL PRESSURE!

so be sure to rotate the old bearings to misalign the oil supply ports.

This is a big dirty job. I hope that helps. Some dealerships in the US sell a kit to eliminate the shafts which includes a snub shaft in lieu of the lower B shaft (so you can keep the oil pump sprocket) and a freeze plug for the face plate of the engine where the upper balance shaft protruded through previously.

Alex Grabau

www.dentsport.com
How you get an Evo II in the U.S.? Can it be done legit, or do you have to do it the way we often have to get things done here in Jamaica :coolsm: .
 
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