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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had my Evo since last year and so far I have been avoiding using the AYC as I thought it was a safety net - like ABS to catch any driver mistakes.

Should I be learning to use the AYC as part of my daily driving, treating it as part of the cars handling setup?

Or is it something to pick up the pieces once the driver's exceeded the mechanical grip available?
 

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dont see how you have ''not'' been using the AYC is an automated system that looks at different perameters (throttle,steering,speed,g force) etc and dirrects power as required , when it cuts in you can usally tell as the car will seam to ''cut in'' faster on a corner you can acctally feel it pushing you around .an odd feeling at first but soon come to get used to it and expect it
 

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AYC is a driving aid. designed to help you get around corners quicker and at higher speed. when the sensors pick up a Yaw moment the AYC progressively kicks in and aids your cornering.

its not designed to sort out your fuuk ups as many owners have noticed. you can only bend the laws of physics so far before they start bending you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
When I say I haven't been using the AYC I mean I haven't been leaning on it.

Once or twice I've felt the car tighten it's line into a corner and have assumed this is the AYC doing it's stuff, but to date I have tried to avoid this as I would avoid bringing the ABS is on a regular basis.

So its a driver aid, to be used as a matter of course, within reason.

Time to start investigating, I've already read elsewhere that to lift off when committed, will result in a trip into the scenery, but wasn't this always so, look at the Peugeot 205 1.9 GTI, or any RWD drive car where the weight transfer will get you, here in addition to that you've got no power to re-ditribute so no AYC.

Thennks for your help.

Paul
 

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I've already read elsewhere that to lift off when committed, will result in a trip into the scenery,
Paul,

This is the same with most cars, take it to a roundabout and give it som pain...or a track.

When you say youve felt the car "tighten its line" I would suggest this is the charachteristic of any 4wd car when the throttle is applied.

If you have an ACD on the car fitting a K1 or K2 computer will give it more of a RWD feel but the best thing to do is take it somewhere with pleny of space or a good run off, cane it and see what happens.

J
 

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if you fully lift off the AYC stops working.

if you feel it going a bit t!ts up then feather the throttle but dont come off completely.
 

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dral said:
Can you explain that? How can the AYC do anything when there's no drive to the wheels? :confused:
AYC is pump driven, therefore can still work, even when off the throttle. It can still pump, therefore altering the (still turning) rear wheels rates of rotation.

MR is the 1st Evo where it works when throttle closed, which is continuing with the IX.

ACD also stays in on the MR for longer. Read the brochure if you don't believe me... ;)
 

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I don't disbelieve you mate, i just didn't know the AYC could be applied as a brake for when there was no power there. The literature i've seen only talks about torque distribution.

I thought difference on the S-AYC was just that it kept working with the Sport ABS, not that it could actually brake the wheels itself.

Every day's a learning day :D
 

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Damd VI said:
AYC is pump driven, therefore can still work, even when off the throttle. It can still pump, therefore altering the (still turning) rear wheels rates of rotation.
But the pump just operates clutch plates? It does not actually supply a turning force to the wheels, the engine does that?
 

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Weebl said:
But the pump just operates clutch plates? It does not actually supply a turning force to the wheels, the engine does that?
Correct. The wheels must be turning for AYC to work. If you come off the throttle, the wheels are still turning. AYC can still engage/disengage the plates to alter the ratio of the diff.

Or at least that's how I understand it. I'm no tech genius, and perhaps I'm explaining it badly. :blush: But I can tell you for sure, AYC works on the MR onwards, even when you come off the throttle. :coolsm:

dral said:
I thought difference on the S-AYC was just that it kept working with the Sport ABS, not that it could actually brake the wheels itself.
Again true. S-AYC was introduced on the VII's. But that's a seperate revision from what I'm talking about here, which was introduced on the MR's. :)
 

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Weebl said:
But the pump just operates clutch plates? It does not actually supply a turning force to the wheels, the engine does that?
he didnt say it did supply the turning force. he said it altered the force.

thats what it does, splits/alters the torque from the engine between the rear wheels.
 

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Damd VI said:
Correct. The wheels must be turning for AYC to work. If you come off the throttle, the wheels are still turning. AYC can still engage/disengage the plates to alter the ratio of the diff.

Or at least that's how I understand it. I'm no tech genius, and perhaps I'm explaining it badly. :blush: But I can tell you for sure, AYC works on the MR onwards, even when you come off the throttle. :coolsm:

Again true. S-AYC was introduced on the VII's. But that's a seperate revision from what I'm talking about here, which was introduced on the MR's. :)
While not disbelieving you, they are dead clever these Japanese, Can somebody explain how you can split torque between wheels when there is no torque input because the throttle is closed?
 

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WULLIE said:
he didnt say it did supply the turning force. he said it altered the force.

thats what it does, splits/alters the torque from the engine between the rear wheels.
With the throttle closed seems to be the key phrase you missed.

The engine is not supplying the turning force and he mentioned pumps, how can it split/alter a torque from the engine that is not there because the throttle is closed?
 

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ahh, i see where your coming from now lee, (i think)

if you come off throttle theres no torque going thru the transmission so the ayc has nothing to split.

maybe if you come off throtte instead of returning to 50/50 it stays locked at 85/15 until the sensors pick up that you are in a straight line again. :confused:
 

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Weebl said:
While not disbelieving you, they are dead clever these Japanese, Can somebody explain how you can split torque between wheels when there is no torque input because the throttle is closed?
maybe they have set it to lock at whatever the split is prior to coming off throttle.
i.e. locking the inner wheel to 1revolution and the outer to 1.5revolution
 

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Theoretically it would possible to use the clutches to apply the engine braking done the prop in different proportions to each half shaft, and adjust left and right rear wheel braking. :confused: It's not something i've heard of before though.

S-AYC is VIII onward, my VII only has the basic AYC and ABS. I do remember that the software did evolve from the VIII to the MR though.
 

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Weebl said:
While not disbelieving you, they are dead clever these Japanese, Can somebody explain how you can split torque between wheels when there is no torque input because the throttle is closed?
That'll be for a better man than me Weebl. But it's there in the brochure, trust me.

I'm at Cirencester next week, to see a certain car. ;) I'll get the answer from Mr Brigden or Andy Veitch, and you can try and put it into something that we'll all understand! :)
 
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