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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Went to Elvington last Saturday. I've done a couple of track days this year (Croft, Oulton, Castle Combe) and thought that playing on an airfield might be a good laugh. The day was a typical wet northern day, but the amount of fun you can have without being worried about crashing was unbelievable. 80 MPH sideways into the 90deg right hander at the end of the straight, with not a barrier in sight.

If you really want to see what your car can do in realative safety this is the best money you'll spend (£60). I'm going to book for the next day there, and hope that the weather is better, so I can run my newly acquired slicks all day, instead of for the last 30 minutes.

Adrian
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I totally agree with the airfield days its just alot of chucking the car around .:D:D:D all the way side ways .
Money well spent and not to worried about the frills of a canteen.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
They are very hard on brakes and tyres though. Be careful with slicks and how they wear.

I gave up doing airfield days because the cost was higher than track days because of the wear and tear. Not to mention the crap and stones that flick up onto paintwork etc.

Depending on the airfield, they often mark the circuit out with cones and some use hay bales. These can damage your car!

The best airfield I have been to is Bruntingthorpe, as it is so close to a track, yet with no real armco or anything.

Just my 2p worth!
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Agree with you about the tyre wear and the stone chips. Just means that you have to stay in front of everyone else :) . Can't beat doing a proper circuit, but there's no way i would drive like I did at Elvington, on a track. They use cones by the way. Seemed to me to be more like doing laps of a tarmac special stage (which is after all what the EVO was built for). If I was going to just do tracks, I'd buy an ex race car.

Anyway I had loads of fun , played at being tommy for the day and will be doing a mix of track and airfields in the future.

I'm starting to think that the EVO's weight is a bit of a problem for track use, and is behind all the brake problems etc. So I'm seriously thinking about building a cossie powered 4x4 Dax Rush for track use. (It'll be cheaper than replacing brakes, tyres, oil, gearbox oil, wheel bearings etc on the EVO). If I do it, I'll get a tow bar fitted, and use whichever car I feel like when I get to the track.

Adrian
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It depends what you mean by the weight being a problem. I was once told that the only place fot weight is in a steam roller. If what you want is a track car and that is all you really want it for, don't mess around and get a single seater. However, Evo's give you something special, a dry car with added protection that can be developed for the track. Just ask Blade.

You are right though, in as far as because of the size, weight and overall cornering capability, the starin on the car is more than the standard brakes and tyres can handle. One might also add the suspension to the list, but at least you aren't ruining it. I am beginning to think that the real problem is that its ability is just too good and that it is too easy to explore the outer limits.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The weight is a problem, but the weight transfer is more of an issue. Controlling the mass of the car better (by better driving and better suspension) will reduce tyre wear and brake wear. More air to the brakes, and ventilated 2 piece discs also help (cooler).

Monitoring tyre pressures as the temperatures rise and adjusting (keep em at 30psi) reduces wear.

Get stiffer bushes, top mounts, or pillowbal mounts, and strut braces - remove the play.

I don't think single seaters are all that, and neither are Caterhams. It is much nicer being indoors than exposed to the elements, and a well set up EVO can be very competitive. Think GT racing with cars like the V8 Beemer, Viper, Lister Storm and 911 GT3 - all heavier than the EVO, and all awesome.

The better your driving, the less wear. When I started out in a near standard car, I was destroying tyres and dissolving brakes. Now I have the ultimate setup, I barely use it (so little wear) as I don't need to brake so often, and can control the car more smoothly, so less weight transfer and less tyre wear. Bit ironic that!
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Where can I find info on local airfield track days? ie Where are they and when are they avaliable?
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Blade

Totally agree with you and I didn't make it clear enough. I would take a tin top for track days every time. I think that the point that I was trying to make is that if you want an out of the box experience on the track, go for a single seater or Caterham style car but I wouldn't. If you want to drive a tin top, you need to develop it, just like you have done. I cannot understand why people think that a road car set up is suitable for the track or even for flat out road work. Ultimately, driving the car flat out on the road puts the same strains on the car as doing it on the track, although I accept that on the track you can do it for more sustained periods.

I cannot agree with you more about the better you drive, the less wear on the car. Although getting the car right certainly is a big factor, do not underestimate the difference your increased skill is making to preserving your car. It seems to be a point that some of our other friends seem not to understand. I am sure that some of them might be quicker in a short sprint like event, such as a hill climb. But 20-30 laps of a track or 30-40 mins of sustained driving? Their tyres, brakes and probably much more would give up well before the end.

Your comment about brakes is is spot on, the better you drive, the less you use them. This is why karting is such a good learning ground for racing. You learn to set up and balance the car on throttle and also to keep off the brakes. The best karters are incredibly smooth and consistant. In fact, this might be the way to have some fun and show who can drive and who cannot. Anybody for a karting event?
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I would pass on the karting event. Being 6ft 3 and reasonably heavy (!) I would be at a disadvantage.

Smoothness|EQU|speed, no question, on road or track. Controlling the mass of the car is key. Admittedly lightening a car makes that easier :)

I would say most of my money has been spent on responsivenessm durability, reliability and lightness. Not that much relatively on power.

People seem to want to slap power upgrades on the car first, and neglect suspension and brakes. Should be the other way round in my book.

Simon - getting back on topic - when you coming on track? 26/11 and 19/12 (Donnington and Oulton Park respectively) - fancy coming along?
 
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