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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After a lot of hard work I managed to get my car back to standard. Buying an old e4 ( my dream car) came with a lot of problems as past owners have all added there own bit without removing the parts not needed or previous installed parts I removed a bucket full of pipes and wires from previous owners. But enough about that and back to the question. With a manual boost control am I correct with this fitting? Pipe from turbo ( remove pill) add one way T piece ( arrow towards turbo actuator) then pipe of T piece to manual boost control (on the side marked in) then from the side marked out just add pipe an let it vent some where. The pipe from the solenoid gets plugged. Or is it. From turbo to boost control then from boost control to turbo actuator? Or am I completely wrong and anyone tell me how to fit manual boost control ??
 

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It'll depend on which boost control/ bleed valve you're using. If it has only 2 ports (and no vent) you'll fit a t-piece between the actuator and turbo, no one way valve to my knowledge, and connect it to one port on the valve. The other port will vent to atmosphere.
If it has 3 ports (most do) you can still connect as above or fit it in place of the t piece, near the turbo. If you want the valve inside the car then the first method of fitting would be the better bet IMO.

Or buy an electronic boost controller & gauge.... and I just so happen to be selling one! :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It'll depend on which boost control/ bleed valve you're using. If it has only 2 ports (and no vent) you'll fit a t-piece between the actuator and turbo, no one way valve to my knowledge, and connect it to one port on the valve. The other port will vent to atmosphere.
If it has 3 ports (most do) you can still connect as above or fit it in place of the t piece, near the turbo. If you want the valve inside the car then the first method of fitting would be the better bet IMO.

Or buy an electronic boost controller & gauge.... and I just so happen to be selling one! :lol:
It's a turbo smart one ( red. That was originally fitted to the car but was removed as I was told it was fitted incorrectly) it has 2 ports on it and a matching one way T piece. ( as much as I would like a new electronic control I don't think my wife will allow me to spend more money on the car so close to Xmas lol )
 

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Check there isn't a one way valve in the t piece, connect it between the turbo and actuator.
Then run a hose from the remaining port on the T and connect it to the bleed valve itself. Valve closed (try blowing through it before fitting to be sure which way is open and which is closed) is low boost and valve open is more boost- so beware! :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ye it's marked as a one way valve. So if I connect it as above then the out let off the boost control just vents and I block of he pipe to the original solenoid ( on passenger side by the bulk head is this right :)
 

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You're now talking about the standard solenoid??

If so, I BELIEVE it was a standard 'T' piece and from that to the solenoid, rather than one from a manual boost controller.
Just because there's an arrow on it doesn't make it a one way valve, you need to find out which port(s) is/ are affected by the one way valve to identify which port goes where if there is any valve.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You're now talking about the standard solenoid??

If so, I BELIEVE it was a standard 'T' piece and from that to the solenoid, rather than one from a manual boost controller.
Just because there's an arrow on it doesn't make it a one way valve, you need to find out which port(s) is/ are affected by the one way valve to identify which port goes where if there is any valve.
Ye that's the right solenoid. My current set up is standard so I have short black hose with a re stricter pill to a plastic T piece on the opposite side it goes to the actuator. The oth par of the T piece goes to the solenoid.
So fitting the boost controller I remove and replace pipe from turbo to new T piece with one way valve ( air flow going from turbo to actuator) the pipe of the old plastic T piece to solenoid is blocked off and the boost control is fitted to the T piece.
 

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I'd leave the existing t piece and restrictor and just put the bleed valve in place of the solenoid.
There's no advantage in removing the restrictor or in changing the t piece IMO.

Out of interest, why do you want to remove the solenoid (ECU electronic boost control) and fit an old school bleed valve?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'd leave the existing t piece and restrictor and just put the bleed valve in place of the solenoid.
There's no advantage in removing the restrictor or in changing the t piece IMO.

Out of interest, why do you want to remove the solenoid (ECU electronic boost control) and fit an old school bleed valve?
Awesome I'll take your advice on that then. Reason for change is when I purchased the car the boost control was fitted and I put it back to stock. But now its back to standard and I plant my foot it just seems to take I time hitting peek boost almost feels like it dose it in stages where as before it was plant my foot and the boost was there. Just feels slow to respond in standard set up
 

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OK, that makes sense as the solenoid is probably staying closed (meaning the waste gate opens sooner) until its up in the revs which will make it boost slower. And because the ECU is controlling the solenoid, it's a mapping issue.

Fitting the bleed valve will likely make it spool faster (as it'll always be slight open) but IMO you'd be unwise to do so without having the map checked. The car will have been mapped to boost that way- i.e. staged/ progressive boost so you'll now be accessing areas that weren't/ aren't tuned, which over time could lead an expensive problem.

I don't know if the boost control, fuel or ignition tables can be adjusted on the E4 ECU. Assuming it to be the case a basic remap would be the best all round solution and cure IMO, not to mention give peace of mind. If not, get hunting for a newer ECU! :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
OK, that makes sense as the solenoid is probably staying closed (meaning the waste gate opens sooner) until its up in the revs which will make it boost slower. And because the ECU is controlling the solenoid, it's a mapping issue.

Fitting the bleed valve will likely make it spool faster (as it'll always be slight open) but IMO you'd be unwise to do so without having the map checked. The car will have been mapped to boost that way- i.e. staged/ progressive boost so you'll now be accessing areas that weren't/ aren't tuned, which over time could lead an expensive problem.

I don't know if the boost control, fuel or ignition tables can be adjusted on the E4 ECU. Assuming it to be the case a basic remap would be the best all round solution and cure IMO, not to mention give peace of mind. If not, get hunting for a newer ECU! :D
Right I better get that checked first then before I start changing things maybe get a newer ecu as well. thanks for the advice
 
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