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Old 08-12-2018, 10:00   #31
Rampant
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Birdsmouths contd...

I was planning to use the circular saw to make the first cut, so needed to adjust the baseplate to both angle and depth.

A fair amount of mental effort went into this stage


I used the plumb cut rafter angle as the reference for the angle:






And then took advantage of one of the hand-cut birdsmouth seats to adjust for depth of cut:




And simply buzzed along the pencil line on the bunch of strapped together rafters to quickly make the cuts that would've taken all day to do individually by hand saw.

To finish the seats was a 3 stage process on each individual rafter -

1 - measure and mark the seat cut:



2 - chop using the circular saw for a good straight and perpendicular up to the corner - which doesn't do the full job due to the blade being circlar:



3 - finish the cuts following the straight and perpendicular datum with the jigsaw. Why didn't I just use the jigsaw instead of the circular saw for step 2 above? Because using a jigsaw on timber this thick has the potential to bend the blade over and create cuts that aren't perpendicular - particularly when you want to start the cut at such an acute angle...




Even starting with the datum cut form the circular saw - the jigsaw blade did bend a little and created a slight variation and angle in each seat - but I can live with this small variation - it gives the project that quirky edge that let's you know it's hand-built by an amateur

Example birdsmouth seat:




contd...
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Old 08-12-2018, 10:08   #32
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and so it goes on... and on...

After finishing all the rafter cuts it was time to lay them all out, nmatch them up, ensure no printed text was visible on the "front" and chose the best looking timbers for the foremost visible rafters.




Then drill some pilot holes for the manly 6 x 120mm apex end screws and 6 x 150mm birdsmouth end screws



Then start raising them into position with a guide string used to keep the apex straight and level.








Next stage - the roof boards
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Je cherche l'orgasme d'auto
J'ai trouve l'orgasme d'auto
C'est une evo VI bleu par le Rountree

***Go soothingly on the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon***
//// Do as you OUGHT, not as you WANT ////
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Old 08-12-2018, 10:25   #33
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Top class work Mark, Respect to you Sir
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Old 08-12-2018, 14:00   #34
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The boards, the boards

Little did I realise the actual physical size of these boards when I ordered them!

8 foot by 4 foot is, frankly, huge.

Even though I'm 6'3", moving them around was pretty tricky, and getting them up onto the rafters was even more so.




Here's my method of cutting the boards in a straight line...

Since I'd planned and designed the entire project dimensions mainly around standard sized materials, the roof is no different - in fact the exact roof pitch was derived from choosing relevant joist length versus board size that fitted in the ballpark of what I was after - I was after a 20░-to-25░ roof pitch, and it just so happened that choosing 3 metre joists, (plus the thickness of side beams, allied to one-and-a-half board width for the roof surface, came out at around 21░-22░ pitch. Result.

So I only had to cut a couple of boards in half - lengthways - to complete 4/5 of the entire roof.

First, measure the halfway point on the width of the board on both ends.
Use another board as a straight edge/ruler to draw a pencil line between the 2 half-way marks on each end.



Then position the circular saw so that the blade lines up with the pencil line.




Then roughly line up the extra straight-edge board to be parallel with the pencil line, while still being in contact with the circular saw base plate...




Screw the top board to the board to be cut - then measure the offset on the screwed end. It doesn't matter that I'm using a ruler that doesn't start at Zero at the edge of the ruler - provided you use the same ruler to position the other end of the guide board.



Then transfer that measurement to the far end and screw the board down on that end too. As long as your first screw is close to the very edge, and provided you've positioned the top board to be closely parallel to the pencil line - which you can easily do with the naked eye, the first end will still have the correct spacing when you fine tune the second end with the correct measurement...



Use the screwed down board to guide the circular saw and cut in a lovely straight line 8 feet long...

Before sliding the 8 foot board up onto the roof - position a couple of screws at the eaves as board pins to prevent the boards sliding back off.




This episode finishes with a useable - although incomplete - car port, Ive used the tarpaulin again to temporarily protect the OSB (oriented strand board) from the worst that the winter weather can throw at it.





The sharp eyed amongst you will notice the change of wheels
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Je cherche l'orgasme d'auto
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//// Do as you OUGHT, not as you WANT ////

Last edited by Rampant; 08-12-2018 at 15:16..
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Old 08-12-2018, 14:32   #35
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Nice work Mark Really has took shape nicely. What sort of roof finish you going for on top of the OSB3?
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Old 08-12-2018, 14:50   #36
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Thanks Jason

It's simply shed felt to finish the roof off.

Whenever there's a break in this weather.



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Old 08-12-2018, 15:08   #37
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That's looking braw

I've spent the last 8 months building a 20m x 4.5m lean-to onto the workshop in my spare time so i appreciate the work you've put into your build. Almost done thankfully!

If you're putting felt down it's well worth hiring a gas torch and heating it all down to the board. If you nail it down the wind will lift it off. Torching it down will give you a 15 year maintenance free roof
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"Understeer" is when you hit the fence with the front of the car. "Oversteer" is when you hit the fence with the rear of the car. "Horsepower" is how fast you hit the fence. "Torque" is how far you take the fence with you.
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Old 08-12-2018, 15:19   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Madmac View Post
That's looking braw

I've spent the last 8 months building a 20m x 4.5m lean-to onto the workshop in my spare time so i appreciate the work you've put into your build. Almost done thankfully!

If you're putting felt down it's well worth hiring a gas torch and heating it all down to the board. If you nail it down the wind will lift it off. Torching it down will give you a 15 year maintenance free roof
I had no idea that this torching was a thing.


Although I do have a tin of brush-applied adhesive/sealant (as well as a tube of felt mastic adhesive) that I was going to use to seal down the edges of the felt.


I'll look into the torch option - thanks
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Je cherche l'orgasme d'auto
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C'est une evo VI bleu par le Rountree

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Old 08-12-2018, 19:02   #39
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Brilliant thread mate, enjoyed it.
Putting anything on the sides? Maybe Perspex? Keep the side winds out.
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Old 30-04-2019, 14:42   #40
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Finally - the closing stages...

After a few months of weather that isn't really conducive to laying roofing felt, finally, I had some time in decent spring sunshine to get the roofing job *almost* completed.


Last year I'd left the job pretty much with the felt loosely positioned on the boards, but the wind had lifted some ends, moved it around and started getting it moist underneath the edges, so I secured all that with a massive tarpaulin to prevent it moving around any more and lifting up with the wind and getting ripped, etc. (Cheap roof felt is pretty flimsy stuff. 100% waterproof, but dead east to rip.)

The tarpaulin wasn't fully waterproof, but that didn't matter, because the felt underneath was the weather-proof membrane for the OSB roof boards...

... and that's the way it remained right through the winter.


Inside the structure itself, I only had the vertical king posts installed and no further bracing.

So this is where I began the closing stages:

Internal roof "webbing" - One of the reasons I'd opted for a ~22░ roof slope was to help with designing the webs. For a web that fitted at 45░ to the vertical, against a ~22░ roof slope (22.5░ was the exact design specification), means that the webs would need a ~22░ cut on the upper end. Funny thing here is that a chop saw has a detent at 22.5░ (half of 45░)
Also, it was a nice "coincidence" that most of the members (King/queen posts, webs. leg bracing) were all designed around 600mm in length, which is also a divisor of the standard timber lengths available (for example 1.8m or 2.4m).

So here's how the webs were marked out and cut...

45░ cuts to chop 1.2m timbers in half:




45░ chop saw cuts






22.5░ end cuts:




Installing webs:






All the webs were pre-planned in advance, sorted and ends cut so that all the virgin fresh wood would be facing toward the front of the car port as well. Any printed lettering would be facing to the back. I plan to sand off the printed lettering later and treat with clear preservative, but there's no rush to do that provided that it looks clean from the start

contd...
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Je cherche l'orgasme d'auto
J'ai trouve l'orgasme d'auto
C'est une evo VI bleu par le Rountree

***Go soothingly on the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon***
//// Do as you OUGHT, not as you WANT ////
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Old 30-04-2019, 15:04   #41
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...contd


The last structural stage was to get the leg-to-joist bracing properly secured. All at 45░ angles. And again, 600mm lengths.

The centre leg bracing was simple. One brace forwards and one brace rearwards onto the side beam, and then one brace inwards onto the centre joist. Why simple? - because there was a lateral truss directly attached to the centre leg. (See above pictures for the jointing I cut out for the top of the centre leg.)

The front and rear legs were not so simple. I'd placed these legs to be in the centre of a gap between 2 of the roof joists. This was for compromise reasons of support and access onto the driveway. They should be as far towards the corners of the car port as possible for greater structural rigidity and support, but putting the front leg in particular at the corner, or too close to the corner meant we wouldn't be able to get a car past the leg easily and onto rest of the driveway and on towards the garage... but putting them too far toward the centre would have meant compromising structure strength too much. It was only a single leg post that was the obstruction (front right when looking forwards "out" of the car port) but I also wanted to build it symmetrical, so all 4 legs were placed one and a half joists from the corners.

This posed as a puzzle on how to connect any lateral bracing, so after much deliberation and test-positioning of several ways of bracing, I chose the neatest solution to have the lateral brace ending in a Tee piece that then attached to the joists in front and behind the leg post in question...

Like so:






All that bracing is "large" enough to provide a sufficient amount of structural rigidity, but not at too much risk of cranial impact zones, except to lanky freaks around 6'3" .
People such as myself
Luckily - at the time of posting - there have been no hollow skull impacts yet?


contd...
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C'est une evo VI bleu par le Rountree

***Go soothingly on the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon***
//// Do as you OUGHT, not as you WANT ////
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Old 30-04-2019, 15:28   #42
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Rainwater ??

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Old 30-04-2019, 15:51   #43
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Working with roof felt is a pain in the arse

...contd


Now we're on the home straight.

That tarpaulin was finally lifted off when the weather was dry, the sun was out and the breeze was light. Which cut into my time that I should have been drinking rhubarb G'n'T in the sun in our garden, but, hey, this project wasn't going to finish itself, so needs must...


The way I'd originally oriented and laid the felt strips were over the apex, starting at the front and working backwards, with a 100mm overlap at each join.
That was simply to get it into position. The plan was then to start securing from the back and reversing the orientation of the overlap, so that the "edges" of the felt were less obvious when looking from the front of the car port.
Sadly, I'd left it as originally laid over the winter - at least after it had been disturbed by a day of strong enough wind to lift one entire section and put rips into it. So the tarpaulin was fitted and left over the winter.

The upshot of this is that the felt edges that were under each overlap had absorbed some of the "blackness" from the underside of the felt on top. This dark strip on each edge is now visible, but I'm hoping that the darkness will fade over time to a more even texture???

Anyway, on with the job - and the first part was to secure lengths of 25x25mm timber under the edge of the eaves of the roof to finally attach the felt to - the timber was stored in the joists in one of the pictures in the previous posts, and I don't have any pictures of measuring or attaching this to the underside edge of the roof because I got carried away, but you'll see what I mean at the end... each ~570mm length (between each rafter) of the 25x25mm stuff was attached with three M6x30mm screws screwed in from above.

Then, this time working from the back of the car port, I positioned the felt nice and square on the roof, tacked it down sparingly and glued some of the edges down with this stuff:



Difficult and messy to use.
First time using it I tried wearing nitrile gloves.
But the first contact nitrile gloves have with roof felt they disintegrate from the sharpness of the edges and the rough grain.
Plus, a wooden "scraper" type improvised tool was the wrong implement to spread the goo with. Plus, it sank into the tin of goo far too easily.
So my hands got covered in the stuff. (White spirit was my friend that day)

Second attempt I just wore proper working gloves and chose a 1" painting brush that I didn't mind discarding afterwards.
Did a much better job.

Working forwards from the back strip of felt, I needed to lift the edges and slide back the next 2 strips of felt towards the front of the car port to make room to work, then re-position the strip forward of the one just laid. After positioning with the 100mm overlap, it was a case of painting the black felt adhesive goo onto the underside of the overlap on both leaves of the roof, test, measure and adjust the position of the strip, and then repeat moving forwards.
Again, I don't have pictures of this stage using the goo, because I would've just ruined my phone, bleurgh.

So each strip of felt is now glued down to the strip on each side inside the 100mm overlap.

The next stage was quite laborious. Felt tacks at 100mm intervals along the entire length of the car port. Hopefully, you'll see what I mean about the 25x25mm strips under the training edge of the roof:








Laborious because I had to go up the step ladder, hammer a few in, get down the step ladder, move the ladder, rinse, repeat.


The felt was also tacked under the front edge:






If you compare where I used to have the shed store in post #1, I had also moved it to the back of the car port to give better turning area for cars on the driveway - in and out of the garage area.

So that's the job, so far, *almost* complete. You can probably make out the dark stripes on the edges of the felt strips in the first picture:




It's now a fairly decent, working, self-designed, self-built piece of history:





Further plans?

Yes:

Mini guttering under the driveway-side eaves, feeding into a water butt.

A square of blocks cemented at the base of each post at ground level to prevent pooling of water around the base of the post (under the gravel?).

The low standalone shed will also be replaced this summer. The plan is to replace it with a built in section at the back of the carport, and extend the roof of the car port over this this larger storage area all the way to the fence at the rear. It's at a jaunty angle, but should provide a far larger, far better walk-in storage room that I don't have to stoop to get things in and out of.


Hope you enjoyed the journey

I'll update the thread if and when I make more progress on those stretch goals...

Yours Aye

Mark H
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//// Do as you OUGHT, not as you WANT ////
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Old 30-04-2019, 15:54   #44
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Oh - and I'd like to put some lighting in as well ???

And paint the underside of the OSB white ???


It's the first 90% of the jobs that always take 10% of the time. The last 10% takes the other 90% of the time...
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C'est une evo VI bleu par le Rountree

***Go soothingly on the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon***
//// Do as you OUGHT, not as you WANT ////
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Old 03-09-2019, 11:15   #45
Rampant
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Extension upgrade

I'm at it again...

A load of timber got delivered last week for the next stage of the build




What is it this time?

See that tool store style shed behind the car?

Well that's being replaced by a full-sized car-port shed-extension.

Which turns out to be another bloody complex thing to design. Again.

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//// Do as you OUGHT, not as you WANT ////
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