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Old 02-09-2003, 01:06   #1
ct9a_uae
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Dyneema an alternative to Kevlar?

According to the company that produces it "Dyneema is a superstrong polyethylene fiber produced using a patented gel spinning process. This remarkable fiber is up to 15 times stronger than steel and, weight-for-weight, is 40% stronger than competing aramid fibers. It has high energy absorption and low elongation. Dyneema floats on water, and is extremely resistant to abrasion, moisture, UV rays and chemicals. As a result, it has an almost unlimited range of applications, providing maximum strength and security for minimum weight".
Does anyone know how much it costs and more importantly if it can be used to make composite parts?
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Old 02-09-2003, 01:36   #2
Saint
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not a clue but sounds like it would be great stuff to make brake pads out of and clutches from

what do you rekkon ?
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Old 02-09-2003, 11:31   #3
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Re: Dyneema an alternative to Kevlar?

Quote:
Originally posted by ct9a_uae
According to the company that produces it "Dyneema is a superstrong polyethylene fiber produced using a patented gel spinning process. This remarkable fiber is up to 15 times stronger than steel and, weight-for-weight, is 40% stronger than competing aramid fibers. It has high energy absorption and low elongation. Dyneema floats on water, and is extremely resistant to abrasion, moisture, UV rays and chemicals. As a result, it has an almost unlimited range of applications, providing maximum strength and security for minimum weight".
Does anyone know how much it costs and more importantly if it can be used to make composite parts?
Hi,
IIRC Dyneema is already used in composite materials known as S-Glass. It has very similar mechanical carachterstics (and also cost) as carbon fibre. It is generally used where the use of carbon fibre is forbidden (as on some classes of racing yachts for example).
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Old 02-09-2003, 11:33   #4
AlexV
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Quote:
Originally posted by Saint
not a clue but sounds like it would be great stuff to make brake pads out of and clutches from

what do you rekkon ?
Nope, opposite to aramidic fibres (e.g. Kevlar) dyneema melts at relatively low temps (a lighter is easily enough to do that).
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Old 02-09-2003, 12:46   #5
Simon7extreme
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Dyneema is indeed used in S Glass and is expensive. It isn't as expensive as the best quality CF but if you can use CF, do so.

Dyneema is used for the making of very low stretch ropes used in sailing. Very nice and very expensive. However, there can be problems with heat so in ropes that have high friction they have developed a special carbon fibre rope........at over £200 per metre for a rope only 8 mm thick!!!
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